Surprise! I’m Pregnant—Here’s Why There Wasn’t a *Big* Announcement.

If I haven’t seen you in person over the last few months (or you haven’t seen glimpses of me on IG stories) you might not know that I’m expecting Baby Wilder in late May 2020! I’m currently, as of April 8, 33 weeks along. There haven’t been any major complications; the baby is healthy, active, and growing daily. So, why no big announcement?

Simply put, there’s something special about creating life and nesting a little human when you’re not being thrust into the public eye. 

As an integrative doctor, it felt like there were some societal pressures on me to have the “perfect pregnancy.” That just because of the field I’m in or because of the healthy lifestyle I promote, I should somehow be exempt from the cravings (hello, frickles!), excessive fatigue, or hormonal rushes that come with a normal pregnancy. I wasn’t ready to promote or explain what supplements I’m taking, how I deal with morning sickness, or what I was eating—I just wanted to focus on learning more about how to be pregnant and grow this precious new human. 

And to be totally transparent? I love my current patient base focused on thyroid, adrenal, hormone, digestive health. I didn’t want my pregnancy to make me suddenly seen as the MIMC expert on fertility—supporting women through natural pregnancies isn’t one of my big passions in medicine. I’ve managed to build a team here at MIMC that does internal jumping jacks every time they see those types of patients come across their schedule (Dr. Danielle Vogler-Bos), and I’d rather connect patients with them.

Not only was I not ready to share my journey with our community publically, but I also wanted to avoid being one of those people shouting from the rooftop that every aspect of pregnancy was beautiful and Instagrammable. Sure, are there moments of amazing joy as you’re watching him bounce around on an ultrasound or feeling him sweetly kick inside you? Absolutely.

But there are also times when the craving for pizza outweighs rational dietary knowledge or he kicks your bladder so hard you’re certain you’ve peed a little bit. Sharing my pregnancy journey would have needed to be real and raw, and maybe I was a little shy about sharing the messy parts. 

So what have I learned during this process?

  • Pregnancy makes you tired and there’s not much to do about it except get lots and lots of rest!
  • These are the months where self-care isn’t optional. I’ve gotten regular chiropractic care, been more diligent about water consumption, read more books, watched more videos on birth and first-time parenting, and processed complex emotions out loud with professionals. 
  • This is a time of extreme and rapid expansion—of not only my body, but of my mind, soul, and purpose in this world. 
  • Minnesota has a wonderful birth community—whatever you’re looking to learn or explore, we have an expert here in the Twin Cities to help you. 

What’s next for me and MIMC?

You can’t get rid of me that easily. Since October 2017, I’ve been putting one foot in front of the other, building, growing, moving, and expanding MIMC and our mission to change what true integrative health care looks like. Here we are in April 2020 still making the same commitment to our community, patients, and members as we did on day 1. 

The foundation that has been built will be rock solid as I take a leave to meet and enjoy time with my new roommate. We’ve got two new team members (read more about them here and here) on board who are excited and ready to take on new patients who need support on their health journeys. They’ll also help care for my patients who need to be seen during my time away. 

On a final note: I’m so grateful to all the excellent role models of working mamas out there who have shown me that I can have my gluten-free cake and eat it too. Your words of encouragement have made me feel able, ready, and excited to continue dynamic “blending” of work and life. 


Wondering which practitioner at MIMC is right to partner with you on your health journey? Read more about Nurse Practitioner Jenikka Tomashek, and Dr. Danielle Vogler-Bos.